Nicholas Prairie is an associate in the Litigation Department, and a member of the Life Sciences Patent practice. He works with life science and pharmaceutical clients of all sizes in the preparation and prosecution of patent applications.

Prior to joining Proskauer, Nicholas was an associate at another Boston firm, where he worked with corporate clients of all sizes. He drafted and prosecuted U.S. and foreign patent applications, and assisted in district court litigation and Inter Parte Reviews. Nicholas’s technical expertise includes small molecules, peptides, and protein conjugates.

Before law school, he worked as a chemist at Ipsen (Biomeasure, Milford, MA) where he synthesized a variety of pharmaceutically interesting compounds including; small molecules, peptides, peptide-drug conjugates, proteins, and protein-polymer conjugates. As a graduate student his research focused on natural product synthesis.

Allele v. Pfizer – The Basics. On April 23, 2021, Pfizer, Inc., BioNTechSE, and BioNTech US, Inc. (“Pfizer and BioNTech”) filed a joint reply supporting of their previously filed motion to dismiss a patent infringement complaint filed by Allele Biotechnology and Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (“Allele”) in the Southern District of California. The patent at the center of the case is U.S. Pat. No. 10,221,221 (“the ’221 Patent”) which covers Allele’s mNeonGreen, a monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein notable for its intense brightness. On May 4, 2021, the court denied the motion to dismiss, leaning heavily of the Federal Circuit’s 2008 decision Proveris Science Corp. v. Innovasystems, Inc. As this case continues to develop it could help shed light on an unsettled issue – are “research tools” categorically excluded from the 35 U.S.C. § 271(e)(1) Safe Harbor?

Continue Reading A Guiding Light for the Research Safe Harbor and “Research Tools”?