Photo of Colin G. Cabral

Colin Cabral is a litigator and trial lawyer specializing in complex patent, intellectual property, and contract disputes.

Colin has wide-ranging experience litigating cases in federal district court. He has represented pharmaceutical companies in patent disputes relating to small molecule compounds and biosimilar drugs. He has also served as lead trial counsel in patent and trade secret matters involving computer software, electronic devices, and consumer products.

Recently, Colin has represented pharmaceutical companies and investors in contract disputes arising out of unsuccessful drug development programs.

In 2017, Colin was named to Benchmark Litigation’s Under 40 Hotlist, which recognizes attorneys under the age of 40 who “have been deemed the most promising emerging talent in their respective litigation communities . . . by peers and clients.”

Previously, Colin served as in-house litigation counsel for a global life sciences company. He also served as a Special Assistant District Attorney in Dorchester, MA.

Colin volunteers as regular faculty for the National Institute for Trial Advocacy. He is Board Chairman of FreeFrom, a charitable organization that helps survivors of domestic violence achieve financial independence. He is also a board member of the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles (LAFLA).

Pharmaceutical drug development is expensive. One recent study estimates that the median cost to develop a new drug is $985 million, while the average is $1.3 billion. And those figures appear to be on the low end of a broad range. Others have estimated the average cost at approximately $2.5 to $3 billion, with costs increasing annually at a post-inflation rate of approximately 8.5%.

Continue Reading “Commercially Reasonable Efforts” Clauses in Drug Development Deals: What Level of Protection Do They Really Provide?

As we mentioned in the early days of the pandemic, COVID-19 has been accompanied by a rise in cyberattacks worldwide. At the same time, the global response to the pandemic has accelerated interest in the collection, analysis, and sharing of data – specifically, patient data – to address urgent issues, such as population management in hospitals, diagnoses and detection of medical conditions, and vaccine development, all through the use of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. Typically, AIML churns through huge amounts of real world data to deliver useful results. This collection and use of that data, however, gives rise to legal and practical challenges. Numerous and increasingly strict regulations protect the personal information needed to feed AI solutions. The response has been to anonymize patient health data in time consuming and expensive processes (HIPAA alone requires the removal of 18 types of identifying information). But anonymization is not foolproof and, after stripping data of personally identifiable information, the remaining data may be of limited utility. This is where synthetic data comes in.

Continue Reading Synthetic Data Gets Real

The Ensuring Innovation Act recently became law after passing in the Senate with unanimous, bipartisan support. According to one Senator, the intent of the legislation was to “close loopholes to prevent awarding market exclusivity to products that do not present true innovation and unduly delay cheaper generic from entering the market.” Is this much ado about nothing, or much to be concerned about?

Continue Reading The Impact of the Ensuring Innovation Act on NCE Exclusivity