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Baldassare Vinti is a partner in the Patent Law and Intellectual Property Groups.

Baldo’s practice focuses on litigating patent, false advertising, trade secret, trademark and contractual matters in federal and state courts and before the International Trade Commission. He is a skilled intellectual property litigator with extensive experience in all aspects of litigation, including trials (jury and bench), Markman hearings, appeals before the Federal Circuit, case preparation and strategy, depositions, motion practice, and settlement negotiations. In the area of patent litigation, he has worked on cases involving a broad range of technologies, including medical devices, diagnostics, immunoassays, orthotics and prosthetics, proton pump inhibitor pharmaceuticals, dental implants, electronic medical records systems, wound dressings, pharmaceutical capsules, digital video compression, electronic book delivery and security systems, mobile phones and mobile media technologies, ATSC digital television standard, navigation, location-based services, bandwidth management, bar code scanning, irrigation equipment, waste management systems, laser inscription devices, and other related technologies. Baldo has represented numerous major corporations in patent litigations, including British Telecommunications PLC, Church & Dwight Co., Inc., Henry Schein, Inc., Maidenform Brands Inc., Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Ossur North America Inc., Panasonic Corp., Sony Corp., U.S. Philips Corp. and Zenith Electronics LLC.

In addition, Baldo regularly handles transactional work, including intellectual property due diligence, intellectual property licensing, structural transactions involving intellectual property, patentability studies, infringement/non-infringement opinions, and client counseling in patent and trademark matters. In addition, he has experience in patent prosecution matters.

Baldo is an author and frequent commentator on patent issues pertaining to medical devices and a host of other intellectual property topics, and has been quoted in the National Law Journal, Bloomberg BNA, Law360, Westlaw Journal and Inside Counsel magazine. He is also a regular contributor of articles published in Medical Product Outsourcing magazine that deal with the medical device industry.

Baldo served as a judicial intern for Hon. John E. Sprizzo of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York and for Hon. Charles A. LaTorella of the New York Supreme Court.

Nearly seven years after the landmark Supreme Court decision in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank Int’l, subject matter eligibility for patent claims under 35 U.S.C § 101 remains a moving target. In Alice, the Court found claims for a computerized escrow arrangement ineligible for patenting because they were directed to the abstract idea of “intermediated settlement” and did not recite an inventive concept that could impart eligibility under Section 101. While the Alice case focused on a software invention, a few recent lower court decisions suggest that, in certain circumstances, medical device patents may not be immune from similar patent eligibility challenges.

Continue Reading Federal Circuit Invalidates Device Patent As Directed to an Abstract Idea

On May 5, 2021, the Biden Administration announced its support for waiving intellectual property protections for COVID-19 vaccines.  Understandably, the news made headlines and stirred passionate reactions from the medical community and IP holders alike. But actually bringing about that waiver will be a complicated process, and one that depends on many countries and parties besides the United States.

Continue Reading IP Waiver for COVID-19 Vaccines: What the United States’ Support Means in Practice

In an opinion issued on March 3, 2021, the Supreme Court of Delaware, one of the top commercial courts in the country, overturned a jury verdict that Glaxo Group Limited and Human Genome Sciences, Inc. (collectively, “GSK”) breached the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing when GSK disclaimed all the claims of a lupus treatment patent it had licensed from Biogen thereby extinguishing its obligation to pay ongoing royalties on sales of its lupus treatment drug. The court’s reasoning and the outcome raise important considerations for life sciences practitioners in the transactional, litigation, and patent disciplines.

Continue Reading Delaware High Court Allows Licensee To Stop Royalty Payments By Disclaiming Patent Claims